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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
hill now facing questions about why the nsa is tapping the phones of some of our closest allies. what exactly the president knew about it. will the nsa have to put an end to it? national news, we heard this over and over. if you like your health plan you can keep your health plan. now thousands of americans are finding out that's not true. including our guest, former democratic congressional staffer that has been an enthusiastic proponent of obama care. she said things are changing and she doesn't know why. >>> after six decades of funs and parodies, is "mad" magazine still hooking kids on satire? >>> good afternoon. welcome to "the lead." i'm jake tapper. top intelligence official in the country and the director of the nsa are testifying on capitol hill as we speak. when pressed about report the nsa has been tapping the phones of foreign leaders, even allies, director of national intelligence, james clapper said that's long been par for the course plans and intentions of foreign leaders would be important for the united states to know. >> that's a hearty perennial as long as i have b
spying on its closest friends. more questions about which world leaders are targeted by the nsa, and why the president claims he knew nothing about it. >>> plus a massive man hunt under wray tonight. prisoners off the run after taking an unusual escape route. >>> let's go out front. >>> and good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. out front tonight. breaking news under pressure. the obama administration has just authorized the release of more details about the american government's collection of telephone data. the director of national intelligence, james clapper just said this in a statement. their declassification is not done lightly. i have determined, however, that the harm to national security from the release of these documents is outweighed by the public interest. now clapper and other officials are all going to be testifying in detail about this program on capitol hill tomorrow. the white house, though, so far has begged ignorance. but what exactly is the president's role? here's what we know. now hear me out here. a u.s. official tells cnn tonight that president obama was brief
of the nsa and the president's top intelligence chief are both there to testify as anger and suspicion grow over accusations of widespread u.s. spying. the worst of it, tapping the phones of u.s. allies. >> we, all of us in the intelligence community, are very much aware that the recent unauthorized disclosures have raised concerns that you've alluded to, both here in congress and across the nation, about our intelligence activities. we know the public wants to understand how its intelligence community uses its special tools and authorities and to judge whether we can be trusted to use them appropriately. we believe we have been lawful and at the rigorous oversight we've operated under has been effective. >> here are a couple questions. these are the biggies. what did the president know? when did he know it and what specifically depends on who you ask. the senate intelligence committee chaired by diane feinstein, she says, we knew nothing, claiming they were kept in the dark about what the nsa was up to. but other officials say president obama or at least his white house staff knew all abou
you, lou. >>> up next, the nsa wiretapping program allegedly spreading from 35 world leaders to the fellow in the center, one of the world's most respected spiritual voices. the obama administration trying to block as well further investigation of benghazi. we'll tell you how next. stay with us. mine was earned orbiting the moon in 1971. afghanistan in 2009. on the u.s.s. saratoga in 1982. [ male announcer ] once it's earned, usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve current and former military members and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. hmm. ♪ mm-hmm. [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now -- but hurry, the offer ends soon. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease the 2014 ml350 for $599 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. for $599 a month help the gulf when we
the "wall street journal report"ed he did learn this summer the nsa was bugging phones of german chancellor angela merkel and other world leaders for nearly five years. followed by a few claims of hhs sebelius obama didn't know about problems of the health care website before the launch. the white house frequently has given a variation on this theme. the question, what did obama know and when did he know it? answer not much and about a minute ago. i mean not much and about a minute ago. and so now we're hearing that from other people that he did know for five years that angela merkel and allies have been -- i mean this is bad. >> the length of time that the program has been under operation or at least the lent of time it has been published with various world leaders. if he did not know, if you choose to believe the president of the united states and i believe the president of the united states, i want to believe the president of the united states. >> some reports suggest he signed off on it. >> if he did not know why didn't he know? the larger question is do we have an out of control nation
from germany to australia. one report claiming not only was the nsa tapping the private cell phone of the chancellor of germany, angela merkel, ever since 2010, but that president obama knew about it. the nsa hitting back, trashing the report with this statement, saying, general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 this alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel. nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel. newsroom reports claiming otherwise are simply not true. germany may be in the spotlight, but that's one of just 30 countries. u.s. allies saying they're furious at the alleged extent of nsa surveillance on their turf. today, the u.s. ambassador to spain was called in for a dressing down by the spanish foreign minister. a spanish newspaper publishing a shocking number, 60. 6-0 million phone calls of average citizens intercepted by the nsa in the past year alone. so joining me now, christiane amanpour, cnn's chief international correspondent and a professor at princeton university. christiane to you, fi
frederick, but how are you doing? >> edward snowden's nsa revelations reaching new heights, getting spoofed on snl. but now the leaker is seeking ce clemens city. >>> and toronto's embattled mayor says he will stay in office. >>> and the sbepgs intentional that was the youtube music awards. that's a real thing? it is? okay. this is "way too early". good morning. i'm bill karins in for brian shactman. it's monday, november 4th. we'll also show and you scary moment in last night's texas/colt game. but first, the country's third biggest airport fully up and running again, but underlying safety concerns after a man used an assault arrival to kill one tsa agent and badly injured two other people. paul ciancia is in critical condition after being shot multiple times by officers. he was carrying five high capacity magazines, a bag of ammo and happennd written lette explaining his rampage. gun control advocates say the incident is unlikely to spark any head way in the limit of gun sales. >>> later today, the president will speak at an organizing for action health care summit looking to rally grass
german chancellor angela merkel. however a german newspaper cites an n.s.a. source claiming the president knew everything as far back as 2010 and gave the go ahead to boost surveillance. we'll be hearing more about this one. >>> 911 calls released from the terrifying moments five people were thrown from a ride at the north carolina state fair. >> yes, we're at the state fair and a ride turned upside down and dumped everybody out! there's people bleeding very bad, like their hand and stuff. >> five people fell [inaudible] >> the ride's operator, timothy tutterrow will face a judge later today. he was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon. investigators say that ride was tampered with and safety devices were compromised. more arrests expected. >>> this one sound like a scene from a movie. four inmates escaped from jail by climbing through a trap door above a shower. oklahoma police say the inmates crawled 30 feet and then escaped through that door. >> this time all they had to do is push the door and walk out because it's not in the jail. if it's that easy they need to revamp. >> the tr
-ed in "the l.a. times." you called for changes to be made to the nsa's massive phone data gathering program and say it's the evidence that it has made us safer is limited. instead it appears that the utility of the metadata program has been conflated with the success of other collection efforts. how do you determine how much surveillance, then, is too much? >> i think we have to weigh what is the size of the program, what is the magnitude of the collection and what are the results it's getting? and even more than that, even if it met that test, even if the metadata program was very successful, we also have to ask, is it necessary to collect all this data or can the program be restructured? in my view, the program can be restructured in a way that has the telecommunications providers retain their own data. i doesn't require the government to get all that data. when we suspect that a phone number is connected to a plot, then we go to the phone company, much as we would do in a criminal investigation. so i think we can get the same information we need. we can continue to protect the country. w
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
have a big place outs dchq, which is a huge listening -- like your nsa, a huge listening -- i'm assuming, as i pay my taxes, that they're listening to everybody. >> yes, i hope so. and who is that lady that -- >> what they're not doing, i'm assuming, is taking notes. i think where we went wrong with the u.s. administration, joe, they wrote it down that they were listen to go angela merkel. >> that's what happens. who's that lady that tells daniel craig what to do? >> m. >> she knows, right? >> yes. i'm just trying to get this straight. the germans, they're rich. the germany at this point is -- it reminds me of cas casablanca. germany has not earned its spying outrage with all of their arms dealings and all the -- anyway, we get involved in everything over here, ross. >> there was a report yesterday, annette talked about it out of frankfurt. there was one report in the german press that said it may -- because of hangovers from the laws post the war, it may not be illegal for the u.s. to spy on the -- to listen in on the german fwoft. so there is some debate about whether the u.
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
that this is connected in a way of the mourdock family in ways that we didn't appreciate. >> connected to the nsa? is this about phone hacking? >> this is about phone hacking. >> we know and don't say anything. >> whether this touches the mourdock family, does rebekah brooks try to rat out the family? i don't think so. becky, in the u.k. do they change the laws around the press? there's been some talk about trying to beef up the laws. some things that would protect the press in good ways but other things that would make it much more difficult. >> are we tamer here than mourdock's tabloids? >> yes. >> we are until we know otherwise but i think we are. >> this couldn't have been more ridiculous. >> that's? >> the new york snoes. >> geno's interceptions cause -- >> the post, you love it? >> they're one step above blogging. >> it's an early read every morning. >> fiction. >> that's fine too. >> when we come back, we're going to take a look at the markets and this week's fed meeting. first, a very happy birthday to bill gates. the microsoft founder turns 58 today. ♪ ♪ (vo) you are a business pro.
't get enough. especially now we're talking about nsa and spying and i can't think of a more appropriate time for this. i'm fascinated by the individuals behind these actions here. >> the secret 6? >> the actual secret six. agent 355, there is a female spy. >> yes. >> we still don't know her name. tell us about her. >> what you have is six spies in the middle of the war, we almost lost the entire thing out of new york. washington gets blown out of new york, we're down to 3,000 men. so he says to get back into new york and take on 40,000 british, i have to set autopsy spy ring. so he's got to find someone who knows new york city. so he gets his trusted lieutenant, talmadge, and he says, listen, find some people we can trust. we've got to get into new york. i got to find out what's going on. one of the people he gets is this agent 355. all we know is she's a lady and she infiltrated the social scene, like you picture in new york city now and she listened and she actually interacted, went to the parties where she overheard people talking about a general ready to give up west point, she ends
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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